Maintain your old Siemens Hipath system

Amazing Trek Across TIbet!

Today Bookpleasures and Sketchandtravel are pleased to have as our guest, Brandon Wilson, author of Yak Butter Blues.

In 1992, Brandon and his wife Cheryl travelled 40 days from early October to the end of November in 1992 over 1000 kilometers travelling along the ancient pilgrimage route across Tibet. Evidently, they were one of the first Western couples to trek this ancient route alongside, by the way, a horse they named Sadhu.

Good day Brandon and thank you for accepting our invitation to be interviewed.

Norm: Brandon, could you tell our readers something about yourself and your wife Cheryl, and why did you want to trek across Tibet and did you ever had any fears prior to your journey?

Brandon: Tashi delek, Norm! We had been travelling for years as budget travelers, traveling light, with only a backpack to sustain us for months on end. In the process, we'd made our requisite trip around the world for a year and had seen many of civilization's greatest achievements. We'd also traveled overland across Africa for nine months (which is the subject of my book to be released in 2005, Dead Men Don't Leave Tips.) So, we were ready for a more intense experience something more in line with that of the great explorers.

Our decision to attempt to trek from Lhasa, Tibet to Kathmandu, Nepal sprung from the notion that this was the ultimate adventure. Everyone grew up with the legend of a Shangri-La, that fanciful place from James Hilton's Lost Horizon. The more that I read about Tibet, the more I was fascinated by its remoteness, inaccessibility, and its exotic reputation.

Then, as luck would have it, we were told several times that this trek had never been done by a Western couple and that it was "impossible!" That ultimately sealed our fate.

As far as "fears" prior to the journey, first, I had real concerns that we wouldn't be allowed into Tibet as independent travelers, since the border had been closed to them for many years. A Chinese organized group tour was simply out of the question for us.

Then, although we were assured the trip was "impossible" due to lack of food, water, accommodations, and maps, personally I was more worried about the weather. Knowing the severity of weather conditions in the Himalayas, would we be able to reach the lower altitudes of Nepal in time before the roads closed, stranding us until May's thaw?

Finally, I must admit that I was also wary about the reaction of Uzi-toting Chinese soldiers along the way, as well as the various cadres of bureaucrats unused to dealing with outsiders. Guess I'd prefer to deal with nature any day, rather than the vagaries of human nature.

Norm: What were the most harrowing experiences you encountered during your journey?

Brandon: It's a toss-up. This entire journey was chock-full of uncertainty. The spectre of running out of food and water was a daily concern. Where would we stay? Would our bodies be able to physically able to make 1000 kilometers at 12-17,000 foot altitude for 40 days?

But I'd have to say that the most singularly harrowing experience we had was being shot at by Chinese soldiers as we overlooked Mt. Everest from a hilltop in Tingri. What do you do?

As second runner-up, I'd nominate that morning where we awoke to a blinding blizzard and realized that we still needed to press on.

Norm: What impressed you most of all about the trip?

Brandon: First, we were impressed by the unexpected generosity of the Tibetan people. Originally we packed a tent, stove and fuel for the trek, expecting to be totally on our own along the way. However, after our first night spent camping in a potato patch, we were taken-in by local villagers who shared their meager possessions, including yak butter tea and a warm spot around their fire. We really grew to look forward to these human exchanges, even though we had to rely on clumsy sign-language and a limited phrasebook to communicate. Fortunately, we started to run into former monks who'd received training in Nepal and still spoke limited English.

Through talking to them, we became better informed about the hardships of living in Tibet today under the Chinese Communist occupation. We learned that Tibetans are prevented from making pilgrimages along the same route that we trekked into Nepal, as they've done for centuries.

So the trip for us became more than just an "adventure" trek. It became a political statement. If we could make their trek as pilgrims, we'd show to the Chinese that it could be done, even by Westerners, without disrupting the geo-political balance of power.

In fact, on the trek's conclusion, we presented a set of prayer flags to the king of Nepal's personal representative at the palace with the hope that the king would fly them as a symbol of solidarity with the Tibetan Buddhists.

Finally, we were impressed by the unwavering faith shown by many of the Tibetans. At night, in the dark stillness of their homes, we shared photos of His Holiness the Dalai Lama with them that we had secreted into the country. Gingerly holding the photo, they touched it to the foreheads of the members of their family, blessing them. Then drawing back several layers of curtains, they reverently placed it in their private altar beside other statues and holy instruments.

After over 40 years of oppression and death, could we still be so patient or retain so much faith?

Norm: If you had to do it all over again in 2004, would you still jump at the opportunity? As a follow up, would you advise anyone else to follow in your footsteps and what are the possible dangers they may encounter today?

Brandon: Frankly, no. This trek is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. From what I've read since then, and I receive Tibetan news every day now, the country has vastly changed especially Lhasa. As inundated as it was then with Chinese settlers, solders and foreign culture, it is even more so today. Now, they're in the process of completing a railroad line into Lhasa from western China, so the transformation will be accelerating, the assimilation complete. The world saw the same effect in Inner Mongolia and Manchuria with the arrival of the railroad.

With that said, I'd love to return, perhaps to the more remote Mustang region this time, far removed from the propaganda tours. Of course this is assuming I would be granted a visa. Writing this book has certainly made that possibility more remote&

However, I would advise readers to explore any part of the world that interests them by walking. There is nothing so satisfying as discovering a culture one-step-at-a-time. This is a traditional way of exploration which creates total immersion in a culture: its food, history, art, architecture, people, language and nature. I like to think of it as a walking meditation, too. You place your body on "auto-pilot" and travel outside, while traveling within.

If readers are interested in this rewarding mode of travel, they can check out several options on my WEB SITE where I have free "how-to" articles about walking some of Europe's most spectacular pilgrimage routes, along with web links for more information.

Walking across Tibet was the beginning of this, my latest passion.

Norm: How would you describe the relationship with your wife after the trip? Reading the book, I noticed there were some tense moments between you both during the adventure.

Brandon: I really admire Cheryl's courage and willingness to take a chance. Traveling with daily hardship, uncertainty, and often life-threatening situations, will put any relationship to the test. Fortunately ours survived and this experience provided an even stronger foundation. If we could survive that, why, we could survive anything.

Norm: Did you keep a daily journal while you were travelling?

Brandon: Of course. It was sometimes hard to find the energy or time at the end of one of these 14-hours days to sit down and write. But I wanted this account of our journey to be real, raw, and authenticnot some romanticized notion of adventure travel. To capture that essence (while the blisters were still fresh) was vital. Time heals all wounds, as they say, and if you wait to write about it all later you lose much of the minutiae of the moment until it becomes merely a Disney version of your memorywithout the dancing hippos, of course.

Norm: After you returned home, did you write any magazine articles about your adventure or did you lecture anywhere about it?

Brandon: I wrote magazine and newspaper articles about the experience, and would have liked to lecture about the journey and situation in Tibet. Living in Hawaii, there's always a logistical problem and cost of traveling outside the islands.

Now that the book is published, if there's great enough interest throughout North America, I would welcome the chance to talk to groups about this life-changing experience and about the Tibet we grew to appreciate.

Norm: Why did you choose the title Yak Butter Blues for your book?

Brandon: Well, as a global citizen, I was so disturbed by seeing the destruction of this ancient culture; the dismantling of temples, the corruption of monastic life; the re-education of a population where the children are prevented from learning Tibetan in schools; the removal of Tibetan food and clothing from the stores, plus the mass settlement of Han Chinese into Tibet causing Tibetans to become a minority in their country.

It is reaching the point where yak butter tea, that nourishing food that has traditionally fed and sustained a people throughout the centuries will soon be all that remains of an enlightened culture, while all the world looks away. These are the "Yak Butter Blues."

(Besides, I liked the kind of Kerouac-ian ring to it!)

Norm: Did you ever hear any news about your horse Sadhu you left behind?

Brandon: The Internet is an amazing tool. Although we wrote to his new owner, the fellow who ran the Kathmandu guesthouse, shortly after our return home, we never heard back from him. Just recently, I "Googled" the hostel and was able to reach his brother.

Sadly, Sadhu, our old friend, passed away a couple of years ago at a very ripe old age. He spent his last years in a luxury resort, but will always be remembered by us as the only Tibetan we could bring to freedom.

Norm: Have you kept in contact with anyone you may have met during your trip?

Brandon: Unfortunately not. We sent copies of some of the photos we took along the journey to families we'd met, as our way of thanking them. That's all.

Norm: How long did it take you to write the book?

Brandon: The first draft of the book was written in a few months. After that, it was revised through several drafts. Then I added the most current news on Tibet I could find, sorted through photos, and incorporated some of the simple truths which were initially planted in the mountains of Tibet and blossomed along more recent pilgrimage treks.

Norm: How are you going to market the book?

Brandon: Ah, the ultimate question! I consider this, in many ways, an extention of the journey. Perhaps, in retrospect, it is just as difficult with over 100,000 books released each year.

We're reaching out to supporters of a free Tibet, colleges and universities, libraries, adventure travelers, trekking and outdoor organizations, newspapers, international adventure magazines, Buddhist and dharma groups, Indians & Nepalese, and independent bookstores to help get the word out. Much of this has been started and we use the Internet a lot to let people know about our web site.

The national reviews so far have been excellent and I'm awaiting others from abroad. Yak Butter Blues is currently listed on Internet bookseller sites from Europe to North America to Japan and Australia/New Zealand.

I'm also writing and sending articles to related sites and creating links, especially to the vast, displaced Tibetan community, as it is their story as much as our own.

Since book promotion these days ultimately rests with the author, I'm participating in book signings and interviews to further develop interest. As I said, if I find there's a great enough interest in presentations, I might be tempted to put together some sort of North American tour. Whatja think?

Finally, after all those small moments along the trail where we felt like we owed our survival to some mysterious force, we have learned to "have faith," to trust that we were meant to have this journey and that I was meant to write this book.

I can only trust that once again we will be blessed and that our audience will find us along life's trail.

Meanwhile, if readers would like a first-hand look at our journey, complete with a sample chapter, maps, photos, Tibetan music and Tibet/Trekking/Peace links, please drop into my WEB SITE. Then take a moment to sign our guest book, email me, tell your friends, or post a review at Amazon.com. Namaste!

Thanks Brandon and I wish you good luck in all of your future endeavours. _________________________________________________________________

Norm Goldman is editor of bookpleasures.com and sketchandtravel.com. Norm is also a regular contributor to many book reviewing sites and travel sites.

Norm and his artist wife, Lily are a unique couple in that they meld words with art focusing on romantic and wedding destinations. You can learn more about them from their site http://www.sketchandtravel.com.

Norm and Lily are always open to receive invitations to write and paint about romantic destinations in the New England states, New York state and Florida.

In The News:

Canary Islands volcano eruption could last for three months, experts say
Wed, 22 Sep 2021 09:36:00 +0100
A volcanic eruption in Spain's Canary Islands could last three months, experts have said.

How bad is the damage in La Palma - and why is lava meeting the ocean so dangerous?
Wed, 22 Sep 2021 06:50:00 +0100
Authorities have warned people on the island of La Palma of fresh dangers after a new volcanic vent blew open and rivers of unstoppable lava flowed towards more densely populated areas and the sea.

Mystery woman found in Croatia with memory loss identified by police
Wed, 22 Sep 2021 16:36:00 +0100
A woman found with memory loss in a remote area of Croatia has now been identified by police.

US to donate 500m extra vaccine shots - as Biden tells rich nations to share 'with no strings attached'
Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:57:00 +0100
The US is buying a further 500 million COVID-19 vaccine doses to donate to other countries, bringing its total commitment to over a billion jabs, President Joe Biden has announced.

Throw away your Chinese phones, Lithuanian defence ministry tells citizens after software discovery
Wed, 22 Sep 2021 11:10:00 +0100
The Lithuanian Ministry of Defence has urged people to stop buying Chinese phones and throw away the ones they already possess after discovering censorship software.



tikatoshop.it

Erfahrungen mit Pallhuber Wein
Agen Bola SBOBET Terpercaya

Travel in comfort and at your leisure with CT Airlink Limousine & Car Service for top quality private transportation and exceptional customer service. We operate Sedans, SUVs & Vans for CT Car Services to covering all Connecticut airports including Car Service from CT to Newark Airport , Mohegan Casino Uncasville CT, Foxwoods Casino Mashantucket CT, Manhattan Cruise Terminal NYC, Brooklyn Cruise Terminal NYC and Bayonne Cruise Terminal NJ. CT Airlink hire licensed and friendly chauffeurs who have in-depth knowledge of the Areas.

Lake Jipe straddling Tanzania and Kenya

So unknown is this treasure of Lake Jipe not many... Read More

Crossing the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel with an RV

New experiences make me nervous, and I assume that holds... Read More

The Wandle Trail - Map and Illustrated Guide

The Wandle offered wonderful trout fishing up to the latter... Read More

How Are Minerals Formed?

HOW ARE MINERALS FORMED?MINERALS are naturally occuring, inorganic solids, with... Read More

River Rafting: An Overview

White-water rafting can be one of the most exhilarating experiences... Read More

True North & Magnetic Declination - A Trick to Make it Stick

Magnetic declination is an essential principle to understand when navigating... Read More

South Africa Safari Top Five National Parks and Game Reserves

A South Africa safari is the ideal wildlife trip to... Read More

Find a Camping Gear Outlet Near You

When you search online for a camping gear outlet you... Read More

How to Grab a Bite to Eat and Help the Planet

You CAN grab something to eat, enjoy every bite, AND... Read More

Should You Buy a Used Inflatable Boat?

There are two types of used inflatable boats for sale... Read More

Drive Me to WA Today!

Western Australia Driving Adventure Great Australian Road Trip Large... Read More

Block Island ? Memorable Vacations Are Made of This

Block Island is a seaside jewel lying 12 miles off... Read More

Hiking Shoes Versus Hiking Boots

Hiking shoes versus hiking boots? Hiking shoes win. Okay, next... Read More

Campsite Meal Planning and Recipe

Hello Again,Today we will be talking about meal planning. Meals... Read More

The Classy Way to Do WA

Western Australia ? South-West Coast driving holiday. Great Australian Road... Read More

Three Classic Hikes Abroad

Paul Scott Mower once said, "There is nothing like walking... Read More

Holidays in Goa

Sun, Sand and Surf ? an apt description for Goa?... Read More

Inflatable Boat Trailers

An inflatable boat trailer is needed if the user has... Read More

Packing a Backpack - A Guide

With so many different designs, packing a backpack will vary... Read More

Camping and Outdoor Activities: Get Involved with Nature

Camping mixed with outdoor activity is a great way to... Read More

A Thumb Sketch Outline of Tanzania?s Attractions and National Parks

The Northern Circuit is probably Africa's most dramatic wildlife area.... Read More

Experience The Real Florida

Every year around 40 million visitors come to Florida for... Read More

Alternatives to Pressurized Fuel

Recently I attended a Boy Scout Leader Roundtable meeting where... Read More

Taking an Alaskan Cruise ? What to Pack

Packing in general can be a hassle. But when going... Read More

The Best Backpacking Food

Maybe your favorite backpacking food is a freeze-dried turkey dinner.... Read More